Verschlagwortet: Religion

For the Love of Bread and Barches – The Very German-Jewish Challah Knife

That Germans love bread seems to be one stereotype that is largely accurate. Given Germany’s rich baking culture, it is perhaps not surprising that it also has a long tradition of producing challot, braided loaves eaten during Shabbat. There were many expressions for challah, including Datscher, Challe, and Striezel.1 The most common terms, Barches and … Continue reading For the Love of Bread and Barches – The Very German-Jewish Challah Knife

The post For the Love of Bread and Barches – The Very German-Jewish Challah Knife appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Identity Migration of Orthodox Churches During the War in Ukraine (Since 2014)

By Denys Brylov and Tetiana Kalenychenko. With the beginning of its independent history, Ukrainian society experienced a religious renaissance, which also began to define identity. Identities did not always remain purely religious, but could also have a cultural and traditional character, such as the self-definition of a Ukrainian as a Christian, despite the country’s multi-religious and multicultural map. Since 2022, the problem of the transformation of religious identities is further exacerbated. Dramatic changes are taking place among the believers and clergy. This study explores precisely these transformations of religious identity taking place under the conditions of the Russian-Ukrainian war.

Kabbalah and Knowledge Transfers in Early Modernity

Foreword to the special issue of the European Journal of Jewish Studies 16, no. 1 (2022) Editors’ Note: As the History of Knowledge blog aims to facilitate scholarly exchange related to the field, the editors wish to highlight this recent special issue about “Kabbalah and Knowledge Transfers in Early Modernity” by reproducing the editors’ foreword … Continue reading Kabbalah and Knowledge Transfers in Early Modernity

The post Kabbalah and Knowledge Transfers in Early Modernity appeared first on History of Knowledge.

African American Lucumí Devotees’ Adoption and Adaptation of African Diasporic Religious Knowledge in the U.S.

This short piece traces how the Black Power era affected the unfolding of the transmission of African diasporic religious knowledge and how it contributed to the evolution of specifically African American variations of Lucumí in the U.S. Most historical studies examining the influence of the Black Power movement on religious expression in the U.S. focus … Continue reading African American Lucumí Devotees’ Adoption and Adaptation of African Diasporic Religious Knowledge in the U.S.

The post African American Lucumí Devotees’ Adoption and Adaptation of African Diasporic Religious Knowledge in the U.S. appeared first on History of Knowledge.

The End of Unity: How the Russian Orthodox Church Lost Ukraine

By Regina Elsner. Since the end of the Soviet Union, dozens of theologians and scholars of religion elaborated on the complicated relationships within the church community of the so-called Holy Rus’. The Moscow Patriarchate defines its territory of spiritual responsibility as encompassing the former Soviet Union – except for the old churches of Armenia and Georgia.

The Russian Orthodox Church and Modernity

By Regina Elsner. Russian Orthodoxy is often suspected to be pre or anti-modern because of its difficulties engaging with a plural and secular society – for example, when relating to democracy, human rights, or gender diversity. After the end of the Soviet Union, the Russian Orthodox Church associated increasingly with the agenda of the political elites in Russia and other successor states of the Soviet Union.

« S’alarmer face aux mécanismes de la vérité » : une conversation avec Montassir Sakhi

Montassir Sakhi, né en 1988 à Rabat, est membre fondateur du Mouvement 20 février. Il s’est engagé depuis longtemps dans les dynamiques militantes et la vie politique du Maroc. En Europe, sa recherche porte sur les mouvements sociaux, l’émergence des idéologies, l’Islam politique en particulier, ou encore sur la problématique de la radicalisation.

Islam, Ethnicity, and Conflict in Ethiopia: The Bale Insurgency, 1963-1970 by Terje Østebø

By Ulf Engel. Contemporary conflicts in Ethiopia are overshadowed by the ongoing war between the government of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed on the one hand and the Tigray People’s Liberation Front on the other. Between 1991 and 2018 both parties were partners in a Tigray dominated coalition front which finally failed to impose its hegemonic nation-building project on the multi-ethnic country.

God in Times of Uncertainty

By Khadija Mohamed Embaby and Amira Mittermaier. In times of profound uncertainty, what does God offer to believers? And how does uncertainty affect believers’ ideas about, and relations to, God?

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search