Verschlagwortet: Migration

“The Ideological Deportation of Foreigners and ‘Local Subjects of Foreign Extraction’ in Interwar Egypt” – Interview with Rim Naguib

Rim Naguib’s article, “The Ideological Deportation of Foreigners and ‘Local Subjects of Foreign Extraction’ in Interwar Egypt”, was published by the Arab Studies Journal this fall. In this interview, Rim discusses her research interests, her recent article, and the complex relationships between colonial legacies and processes of national independence in (interwar) Egypt.

Migrant Dreams: Egyptian Workers in the Gulf States

Interview with Samuli Schielke. Samuli Schielke’s latest book, Migrant Dreams: Egyptian Workers in the Gulf States (AUC Press, 2020), is a vivid ethnography of Egyptian migrants to the Arab Gulf states. It investigates the imagination that migration thrives on, and the hopes and ambitions generated by the repeated experience of leaving and returning home.

Exiled Among Nations: German and Mennonite Mythologies in a Transnational Age – Interview with John P.R. Eicher

Earlier this year, the monograph “Exiled Among Nations: German and Mennonite Mythologies in a Transnational Age” by John P.R. Eicher was published by Cambridge University Press, in the Publications of the German Historical Institute Series. We talked with the author about the origins of his book, the role of institutions for diasporic groups and links between his research and today’s world.

Call: Doing Historical Research on Migration in the Digital Age

Lorella Viola and Machteld Venken at the Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History seek applications for a large panel on „Doing Historical Research on Migration in the Digital Age.“ Deadline: November 20, 2020.

The post Call: Doing Historical Research on Migration in the Digital Age first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Not a Given Object: What Historians Can Learn from the Reflexive Turn in Migration Studies

„Migration“ is not a stable, preexisting category but rather a product of societal processes that shape what the term comprises. We must take these entanglements with the past into account in our present-day research.

The post Not a Given Object: What Historians Can Learn from the Reflexive Turn in Migration Studies first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search