Verschlagwortet: History

#IchBinHanna: What next?

Since around the middle of June 2021, academics in Germany have been posting reports of their experiences and criticisms of the Wissenschaftszeitvertragsgesetz (WissZeitVG) or German Law on Fixed-Term Contracts in Higher Education and Research1 under t…

Humanities in Germany: Sciences Among Sciences

By Sabine Behrenbeck (Head of Department for Higher Education, German Council for Science and Humanities, Germany). There are many common problems and complaints regarding the humanities in anglophone nations and Germany, but there is also one important difference: In Germany the disciplines dealing with culture and language, religion and history are “sciences among sciences” (Wissenschaften unter Wissenschaften).

Essentialism and the Making of African Refugees

By Rose Jaji. African “refugeeness” in the media, policy, and academia is an essentialist physical image conflating material deprivation and multiple victimhoods. Historically, African refugees were capable of political participation even to the point of building vibrant states in the new lands they fled to in precolonial Africa.

European Textile Production Subcontracting and the Transformation of Apparel Factories in Yugoslavia and Morocco

By Goran Musić. The effects that the emergence of “fast fashion” and textile production subcontracting have had on gendered labor in the European periphery is a relatively well researched topic in recent years. Though, there is a lack of historical perspectives explaining how these labor relations originally gained ground inside protectionist and planned economies during the Cold War.

History: An Important but Potentially Dangerous Part of the Humanities

By Antje Flüchter (History, University of Bielefeld, Germany). Before I start, I want to lay open the social and cultural position I am writing from: I write this piece as a historian, from a White female German perspective: History is a part of the humanities, but history is perhaps closer to politics and power than some of the other parts of the humanities.

Tracks of Change: Labor, Nature, and the Izmir-Aydın Railroad

By Onur İnal. On an October afternoon in 1857, a great crowd gathered at the Caravan Bridge in Izmir to witness an historic moment. Mustafa Pasha, the Governor of Izmir, the müftü, or chief jurist, of Izmir, the Greek and Armenian bishops, the chief rabbi of the Jews, Izmir-Aydın railway company officials, and elegantly dressed men and women were all at present.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search