Markiert: Articles

European Émigrés and the Transatlantic Circulation of Knowledge: Examples from Mid-20th-Century Consumer Capitalism

Many European émigrés escaping the Nazis helped shape consumer capitalism in the United States. After the war, they did business in Europe as well, circulating their transformed knowledge to shape marketing there.

The post European Émigrés and the Transatlantic Circulation of Knowledge: Examples from Mid-20th-Century Consumer Capitalism first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

German Migrants and the Circulation of Buddhist Knowledge between Germany and British Ceylon

Germans translated Buddhist texts in Germany, and they migrated to British Ceylon in order to get closer to Buddhism. Their Buddhist practices ended up changing Buddhism’s relationship to texts in their South Asian home.

The post German Migrants and the Circulation of Buddhist Knowledge between Germany and British Ceylon first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Crossing Borders: Chinese Immigrant Children and the Production of Knowledge

As Chinese children and youth immigrated to the United States in the late 1800s and early 1900s, they had to overcome increasing restrictions on their entry. This piece describes the knowledge they formed and passed on to succeed.

The post Crossing Borders: Chinese Immigrant Children and the Production of Knowledge first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

“The name of the game was globalization of goods, services and finance” and India was increasingly part of it – Interview with Michael Gadbaw

Stefan Tetzlaff, social and economic historian and former research fellow at the German Historical Institute Washington, had the chance to interview Michael Gadbaw, former vice-president and Senior Counsel of General Electric (1990-2008) about his involvement with India. The interview was conducted in Potomac, Maryland, in April 2019.

Marginalized Migrant Knowledge: The Reception of German-Speaking Refugee Historians in West Germany after 1945

The work of both Hans Rosenberg and Raul Hilberg was initially marginalized, but later entered the mainstream of German historiography. Why? What role did migration play in their work and its reception?

Der Beitrag Marginalized Migrant Knowledge: The Reception of German-Speaking Refugee Historians in West Germany after 1945 erschien zuerst auf Migrant Knowledge.