Verschlagwortet: Articles

Trade Union Knowledge and Educational Programs for Yugoslavian Workers in West Germany, 1970s–1980s

The author examines records from trade union seminars given by IG Metall to Yugoslav workers in West Germany. Initially, the classes reflected the union’s needs, but xenophobia in the 1980s led immigrant workers to express their own concerns in these meetings.

The post Trade Union Knowledge and Educational Programs for Yugoslavian Workers in West Germany, 1970s–1980s first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Displacement in Stills: German-Jewish Photographers on the Move

In this two-part piece about Jewish refugee photographers, the authors “travel to another historical context to inquire about what migrants and refugees ‘knew’ and how they choose to communicate their knowledge in their photographic work.”

The post Displacement in Stills: German-Jewish Photographers on the Move first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Some Challenges for Knowledge Transfer in Jewish Displaced Persons Camps after World War II

Finding suitable teaching materials to prepare Jewish children and youth for their new lives in Palestine after having survived the Holocaust presented a unique set of challenges.

The post Some Challenges for Knowledge Transfer in Jewish Displaced Persons Camps after World War II first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Knowledge as a Strategy on the Migratory Routes of Polish Jewish Survivors after World War II

Using oral history, the author explores how a Polish Jewish family “used knowledge as a strategy not merely to survive but to build a new life” in what turned out to be a highly contingent transit process.

The post Knowledge as a Strategy on the Migratory Routes of Polish Jewish Survivors after World War II first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Where is the Migration Innovation? The Habsburg State vs. Facilitators of Migration

Migration strategies and state regulative measures exist in a dialectical relationship. The author looks at state efforts to control emigration from the Habsburg monarchy and the efforts of migration facilitators to satisfy demand for passage to South America.

The post Where is the Migration Innovation? The Habsburg State vs. Facilitators of Migration first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Drifting Along: Unemployment and Interwar Social Research, from Marienthal to Muncie

The author looks at the relationship between two famous early sociological community studies, “Middletown” and “Marienthal.” The latter became Paul Lazarsfeld’s “ticket out of Europe just as the continent was descending into fascism.”

The post Drifting Along: Unemployment and Interwar Social Research, from Marienthal to Muncie first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Transatlantic Migrants and Knowledge in the U.S. Immigrant Press

The author discusses the source value of U.S. immigrant newspapers. If there are many reasons to approach them with caution, they can still help scholars learn “what migrants knew and wanted their fellow migrants to know…”

The post Transatlantic Migrants and Knowledge in the U.S. Immigrant Press first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

“The Ideological Deportation of Foreigners and ‘Local Subjects of Foreign Extraction’ in Interwar Egypt” – Interview with Rim Naguib

Rim Naguib’s article, “The Ideological Deportation of Foreigners and ‘Local Subjects of Foreign Extraction’ in Interwar Egypt”, was published by the Arab Studies Journal this fall. In this interview, Rim discusses her research interests, her recent article, and the complex relationships between colonial legacies and processes of national independence in (interwar) Egypt.

From Hoyerswerda to Welcome Culture: Asylum and Integration Policy in the Federal Republic of Germany

Annette Lützel explains the FRG’s very different responses to the large numbers of refugees who came in the early 1990s and in 2015. Citing recent employment and job-training numbers, she sees an ongoing positive trend.

The post From Hoyerswerda to Welcome Culture: Asylum and Integration Policy in the Federal Republic of Germany first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Not a Given Object: What Historians Can Learn from the Reflexive Turn in Migration Studies

“Migration” is not a stable, preexisting category but rather a product of societal processes that shape what the term comprises. We must take these entanglements with the past into account in our present-day research.

The post Not a Given Object: What Historians Can Learn from the Reflexive Turn in Migration Studies first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search