Kategorie: 20. Jahrhundert

GiD Lab: Erinnerungskulturen in Deutschland, Polen und Russland – Nachbericht und Video

Die jüngste Veranstaltung aus der Reihe „Geisteswissenschaft im Dialog“ (GiD) widmete sich am 27. Januar 2021 den aktuellen Herausforderungen des Gedenkens an den Holocaust und den Zweiten Weltkrieg in Deutschland, Polen und Russland. Die Veranstaltung der Max Weber Stiftung mit ihrem DHI Moskau sowie der Abteilung für Osteuropäische Geschichte der Uni Bonn fand im Online-Format statt. Für all diejenigen, die die Podiumsdiskussion verpasst haben: Die Aufzeichnung und einen Nachbericht gibt es jetzt hier auf dem Blog. 

Transatlantic Migrants and Knowledge in the U.S. Immigrant Press

The author discusses the source value of U.S. immigrant newspapers. If there are many reasons to approach them with caution, they can still help scholars learn „what migrants knew and wanted their fellow migrants to know…“

The post Transatlantic Migrants and Knowledge in the U.S. Immigrant Press first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

“The Ideological Deportation of Foreigners and ‘Local Subjects of Foreign Extraction’ in Interwar Egypt” – Interview with Rim Naguib

Rim Naguib’s article, “The Ideological Deportation of Foreigners and ‘Local Subjects of Foreign Extraction’ in Interwar Egypt”, was published by the Arab Studies Journal this fall. In this interview, Rim discusses her research interests, her recent article, and the complex relationships between colonial legacies and processes of national independence in (interwar) Egypt.

Book Review: A. Getachew: Worldmaking after Empire

By Christopher J. Lee. Worldmaking after Empire is a study of political thought and institution building during the twentieth century, with a specific focus on black Anglophone leaders and intellectuals such as W. E. B. Du Bois, George Padmore, Kwame Nkrumah, Michael Manley, and Julius Nyerere. The central argument of the book is that the anticolonialism they promoted was not solely concerned with national self-determination and the establishment of nation-states.

Reading Tip: ‘The Book That Would Not Die’

Donna Gabaccia reflects on the reception of William Foote Whyte’s famous Street Corner Society at the Migrant Knowledge blog: William Foote Whyte’s study of Italian immigrants in the North End of Boston was not particularly successful after its release in 1943. In the years after 1970, though, Street Corner Society garnered great success and became, … Continue reading Reading Tip: ‘The Book That Would Not Die’

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search