Kategorie: TRAFO

Capitalism and Rent: A Destructive Relationship – An Interview with Hartmut Elsenhans

Hartmut Elsenhans’s new book “Capitalism and Rent: A Destructive Relationship” (2023) is a summary of his central argument on capitalism: Capitalism, profit and development depend on rising mass incomes and hence on the empowerment of the labouring masses. The powerful always fight against such empowerment, with increasing success because of globalisation of rent. A conversation with Rachid Ouaissa.

Woman, Femininity, Body, & Medicine in Nawal El Saadawi’s novella Memoirs of a Woman Doctor (1960)

By Dalia Said Mostafa. Nawal El Saadawi (1931-2021) was a renowned Egyptian feminist activist, physician, writer, and novelist. Her passing away in March 2021 led to countless obituaries underscoring her accomplishments and celebrating her outstanding career in fighting for gender equality and social justice for women, men and children. But El Saadawi was also a controversial figure who caused much disturbance to authorities in Egypt due to her long-standing feminist activism against patriarchal dominance and the oppression of women. This essay focuses on her first short fictional work Memoirs of a Woman Doctor, which was published in the original Arabic in 1960.

Wie erzählt man von einem Kriegsverbrechen? Zu Roman Ljubyjs Film Iron Butterflies über den Abschuss des Passagierflugzeugs MH17 im Donbas

Von Fabian Erlenmaier. Am 17. Juli 2014 schossen russische Soldaten im Donbas mit einer Bodenluftrakete auf ein Passagierflugzeug. Das in Amsterdam gestartete Flugzeug mit dem Ziel Kuala Lumpur stürzte ab. Alle 298 Insassen des Flugs MH17 starben. Roman Ljubyjs Film Iron Butterflies (2023) dokumentiert auf beeindruckende Weise ein Kriegsverbrechen. Der Auftaktfilm des Ukrainian Film Festival Berlin macht dieses für eine breite Öffentlichkeit sichtbar.

Inequalities, Economies of Fear and Geopolitical Turmoil: Southeastern Europe and Central America Beyond Borders

By Felipe Hernández. This article explores the socio-political costs of global destabilization in countries where democracy is a contested terrain between opposing actors and where the rule of law is a reality experienced by a minority. Nowadays, South Eastern Europe and Central America allow us to follow the shadow zones of democracy, where a large part of their inhabitants live a life on the margins of the globalization of capital.

Avtoportreti Zghvarze: A Film Essay on Memory, Hope and the Search for One’s Identity

Anna Dziapshipa’s essay film “Self-Portrait Along the Borderline” (2023) was screened as part of the Georgian Film Series at the Ukrainian Film Festival (UFF) in Berlin. In the film, Dziapshipa uses her family archive to reconstruct an intimate portrait of her Georgian-Abkhazian family and to reflect on broader issues of identity and memory in the context of war. A review by Ekaterina Grineva.

Retrospective as a New Perspective: An Insight into the 4th Ukrainian Film Festival Berlin

With this year’s motto No Time Like Home (Дім в часі in Ukrainian), the fourth edition of the Ukrainian Film Festival Berlin took place from the 25th to 29th October. Having screened a total of 19 short films, ten recent full-length films and three additional films in the Retrospective programme, as well as three recent Georgian films, across five different cinemas, the festival proved to be a growing success in Berlin’s cultural landscape. A review by Oleksii Isakov.

Politics of Distorted Numbers: How Russia is Counting Displaced Ukrainians and Why?

By Lidia Kuzemska. The scales of displacement and return have symbolical meanings for state actors, either of political failure (massive outflow of population) or political success (high number of returns). In the case of forced displacement of Ukrainians to Russia, the inflated and unverified number of border crossings between Ukraine and Russia, moreover, provided only by the Russian side, mistakenly transformed into a number of supposedly real individual Ukrainians fleeing the Russian invasion in the direction of the aggressor state.

The Politics and Poetics of the New Man’s Body Image in the Modernist Novel: A Sufi Comparative Study of D. H. Lawrence’s Women in Love, Mohamed Khaldi’s Awted, and Abdallah Laroui’s Awaraq – 5in10 with Cyrine Kortas

Cyrine Kortas is a Tunisian postdoctoral fellow at MECAM centre, majored in English literature. She is an associate professor at the Higher Institute of Languages, Gabes, Tunisia and a researcher at the LAD lab unit at the faculty of arts and humanities Sfax. Her research interests include: comparative literature, feminist and gender studies, as well as teaching literature in EFL classrooms.

The Self-in-Crisis in the Contemporary Turkish Novel: A Case for the Relevance of Medical Humanities

By Burcu Alkan. This article examines the self-in-crisis in the Turkish novel, more specifically the origins and functions of “the psychiatric turn” in representations of madness in contemporary Turkish novels. It examines how the novelists engage with psychiatric medicine and discusses why such an engagement has become prominent in exploring existential crises in the novelistic imagination in recent years.

The Covid-19 Crisis as an Ideological Armory for the Populist Right in Spain and Italy

By Amélie Jaques-Apke. As Europe begins to emerge from a pandemic, we begin to evaluate emerging
political damages. Now more than ever, we must understand how radical right populist parties design their message toward vulnerable, crisis-shaken populations. The objective of this study is to reflect
critically on the interplay between democracy and populism, exploring recent discursive developments of
the parties Vox and The League and its power relations, which are linked to the exogenous shocks provoked
by the pandemic. The author used qualitative techniques of content analysis, and conducted interviews with scholars and political actors, and group discussions with local actors for several months.

The World in the Rearview Mirror of an Isuzu D-Max: Mohamed Bettaieb and the Tunisian Southern Imaginary

By Joshua E. Rigg. In Al-Janub Ya Kibdiyy (The South, My Dear Son; lit. The South, My Liver), Mohamed Bettaieb (b. 1985), offers an alternative vision. His work deals with everyday life in Tunisia’s south – its economy, culture, history and myth. Collected and edited by the journalist and North African correspondent, Bassam Bounenni, the book brings together a selection of Bettaieb’s satirical morality tales, comments on current events, personal memoir and confessions, and literary and philosophical discussions. A review.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search