Kategorie: Persönlichkeiten und Regionen

Episode 3: Stereotype, Diskriminierung und Rassismus – Auf den Spuren chinesischer Migration im Pazifikraum

Die dritte Episode unserer Forschungsreise führt uns nach Kalifornien, an das Pacific Regional Office des Deutschen Historischen Instituts Washington. Dort forschen die beiden Historiker Sören Urbansky und Albert Manke zur Geschichte chinesischer Migrationsgemeinschaften im transpazifischen Raum.

Urban Parks in Late Ottoman Istanbul

By Mustafa Emir Küçük. People have used green spaces for recreational purposes throughout history, yet the concept of the park as a designed green space for people’s recreation in the middle of the city developed on an international scale in the nineteenth century. In Istanbul, the construction of urban parks was one of the many urban infrastructural projects in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Countdown to 9/11

27 August 2021 | Author: Maurus ReinkowskiI am sitting here at my desk that the Orient-Institut Istanbul has graciously provided me with for the month of August in an attempt to pursue a project of mine from olden times, that is, to make sense of the varying nature of “peripheries” in the Ottoman Empire. As an Ottomanist teaching also Islamic Studies at my home university in Basel, Switzerland, I am particularly grateful and impressed by the fact that I was assigned a room where one can find many classics of Islamic Studies on the shelves.

Imagining the Telegraph in the Ottoman Empire

By Pauline Lewis. By the 1880s, approximately 20,000 miles of telegraph wires and cables stretched across the Ottoman Empire, circulating more than three million electrical messages each year. As scholars have convincingly shown, the technology offered a powerful new tool for the Ottoman central government to exert direct control over distant populations and provinces.

Urban Agriculture in Pre-Modern Istanbul

By Ayşe Nur Akdal. Today, one can find it bizarre to come across a rural element in cities. However, historically, there was not a clear distinction between urban and rural. Agricultural and urban space existed together. Due to a lack of sufficient preservation and transportation technologies, easily perishable foods, such as dairy products and vegetables, were produced in urban areas. Istanbul was a good example with widespread and plentiful market gardens (2017; 11-18).

Missionary Anxiety Along Ottoman Istanbul’s Railways

By Gabriel Doyle. When new railway lines started to crisscross Ottoman territory at the end of the 19th century, the infrastructural change fuelled a missionary awakening. Catholic congregations, especially, were interested in the urban and rural areas around the Anatolian railway line, which started to be built in 1889 and intended to link Istanbul to Ankara.

Germans Go Subtropical: Migration and the Quest for Environmental-Climatic Knowledge in South America

German migration in subtropical South America began in the early nineteenth century. It lasted for almost 150 years and shaped one of the most extensive projects of transnational forest colonization and global agricultural exchange in history. This experience catalyzed the formation of different bodies of knowledge, many of them currently either lost or “fugitive,” as … Continue reading Germans Go Subtropical: Migration and the Quest for Environmental-Climatic Knowledge in South America

The post Germans Go Subtropical: Migration and the Quest for Environmental-Climatic Knowledge in South America appeared first on History of Knowledge.

News from the Network: Experiences of Free Chinese Migrants in the Americas

A new monograph by Albert Manke is now available, ‚Coping with Discrimination and Exclusion: Experiences of Free Chinese Migrants in the Americas in a Transregional and Diachronic Perspective.‘ It appears in the Inter-American Studies series.

The post News from the Network: Experiences of Free Chinese Migrants in the Americas first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Seasons of Capitalism: Human and Non-Human Nature in the Making of Lebanon’s Silk Industry

By Graham Auman Pitts. Capitalism had it seasons in late-Ottoman Mount Lebanon. Each spring, the families that tilled orchards of mulberries purchased the eggs they needed on c­­­­­redit. Mulberry leaves nourished the eggs, which hatched and began to spin their cocoons once the temperature was reliably above 16° Celsius.

The Fijeh Water Project and the Cholera Epidemic in 1903 Damascus

By Benan Grams. On June 30th, 1903 Sultan Abdulhamid II approved a project to bring potable water to Damascus from the Ein el-Fijeh spring. The project was presented to the central government by Nazim Pasha, the governor of Syria, during a persistent cholera epidemic that afflicted Damascus throughout that year.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search