Kategorie: DHI Washington

„Acclimated to Yellow Fever“

Das historische Konzept des Immunkapitals und seine Bedeutung für die afroamerikanische Minderheit in den USA – ein Gespräch mit der Historikerin Elisabeth Engel, die seit 2014 als Fellow am Deutschen Historischen Institut Washington forscht. Dieses Interview erscheint parallel in der aktuellen Ausgabe unseres Magazins „Weltweit vor Ort“ 02/20.

Interview with Digital History Fellow Jana Keck

We would like to extend a warm welcome to our new Digital History Fellow Jana Keck. Her fields of research include German and American Literature and Culture in the Nineteenth Century, Periodical Studies, and Digital Humanities. She began her academic career at the University of Stuttgart, where she studied English and Linguistics. In 2017 she received her Master’s from the University of Stuttgart with her thesis “Gottfried Duden’s Bericht über eine Reise nach den westlichen Staaten Nordamerikas (1829) and Its Emigration Stimulus.” In the same … Continue reading Interview with Digital History Fellow Jana Keck

Not a Given Object: What Historians Can Learn from the Reflexive Turn in Migration Studies

„Migration“ is not a stable, preexisting category but rather a product of societal processes that shape what the term comprises. We must take these entanglements with the past into account in our present-day research.

The post Not a Given Object: What Historians Can Learn from the Reflexive Turn in Migration Studies first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

GiD Lab: Interviewreihe – Folge 2 mit Claudia Roesch und Axel Jansen

Für die zweite Folge unserer Interviewreihe „Schöne neue Welt? – Chancen und Grenzen medizinischen Fortschritts in Geschichte und Gegenwart“ hat der Wissenschaftsjournalist Dr. Jan-Martin Wiarda mit Dr. Axel Jansen und Dr. Claudia Roesch gesprochen. Das Interview gibt’s nun zum Anschauen hier auf dem Blog.

GiD Lab: Interviewreihe – Claudia Roesch und Axel Jansen stellen sich vor

Die GiD-Interviewreihe „Schöne neue Welt? – Chancen und Grenzen medizinischen Fortschritts in Geschichte und Gegenwart“ geht in die zweite Runde. In diesem Beitrag erfahrt ihr, wer Claudia Roesch und Axel Jansen sind, zu welchen Themen sie forschen und wie ihr eure Fragen an sie stellen könnt.

readme.txt: „The World of Children: Foreign Cultures in Nineteenth-Century German Education and Entertainment“

Lesen, Schreiben und Publizieren sind die Essenz von “Geisteswissenschaften als Beruf”. In dieser Folge von readme.txt stellt Simone Lässig, Direktorin des Deutschen Historischen Instituts in Washington, ihren zusammen mit Andreas Weiß herausgegebenen Band „World of Children: Foreign Cultures in Nineteenth-Century German Education and Entertainment“ vor.

Social Media as a Distinct Form of Knowledge Production

When I started blogging in 2016, I had not been an active reader of blogs. I liked the idea of reaching out to a broader public by blogging about my research project on the eponymously titled Migration and Belonging, not least because it was publicly funded, but what exactly would it mean to blog as … Continue reading Social Media as a Distinct Form of Knowledge Production

The German National Library and its virtual exhibitions

During the current COVID crisis, people around the world have felt more physically isolated than ever. Yet, digital media have offered an exciting range of experiences to explore history in a virtual environment. For example, the German National Library currently offers seven virtual exhibitions in German and English accessible from anywhere around the world. From the exhibition “5000 years of media history online,” in which you can learn about the importance of Egyptian hieroglyphs as one of the first written systems of humanity, to … Continue reading The German National Library and its virtual exhibitions

Bachelor Thesis Research during Covid-19

Editorial note: Betty Schaumburg is an intern at the German Historical Institute in Washington D.C. She is about to graduate with a B.A. in American Studies from the University of Heidelberg in Germany. Her High School exchange in 2012 in Wisconsin sparked her curiosity in US history. During the course of her undergraduate studies, she also participated in the exchange program of Heidelberg University and spent her junior year at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. There, she narrowed her historical interest to … Continue reading Bachelor Thesis Research during Covid-19

Public and Scientific Uncertainty in the Time of COVID-19

As historian of science Lorraine Daston recently remarked, COVID-19 has thrown us back into a state of “ground-zero empiricism.” The manifold manifestations of COVID-19 and the many unknowns involved are provoking scientific speculation that is often based on nothing more than chance observations and personal anecdotes. The radical uncertainty of the current situation, writes Daston, … Continue reading Public and Scientific Uncertainty in the Time of COVID-19

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search