Kategorie: DHI Washington

Blogging Histories of Knowledge in the Context of Digital History

A little article about this blog that I wrote with Kerstin von der Krone is now open access. See “Blogging Histories of Knowledge in Washington, D.C.,” in “Digital History,” ed. Simone Lässig, special issue, Geschichte und Gesellschaft 47, no. 1 (2021): 163–74. The abstract reads: The authors reflect on their experiences as the founding editors … Continue reading Blogging Histories of Knowledge in the Context of Digital History

The post Blogging Histories of Knowledge in the Context of Digital History appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Six Calls That Caught Our Attention

Conference: What Makes a Philosopher Good or Bad? Intellectual Virtues and Vices in the History of Philosophy. Utrecht University, November 25–26, 2021. Proposal deadline: August 21, 2021. Conference: Professorial Career Patterns Reloaded – Data, Methods and Analysis of Digital Humanities Research in the Field of Early Modern Academic History. Herzog August Library, Wolfenbüttel, and HTWK … Continue reading Six Calls That Caught Our Attention

The post Six Calls That Caught Our Attention appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Transatlantic Connections of the Women’s Movement in the Long 19th Century: Interview with Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson

Editorial Note: Professor Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson has been Chair of the Transatlantic History and Culture Department at the University of Augsburg since 2016. Previously, she served for five years as Deputy Director of the German Historical Institute in Washington, D.C. Her research focuses on Transatlantic relations, African American history, women’s history, and religious history. As part of her blog series on the history of the women’s movement in a transatlantic perspective, Marietheres Pirngruber spoke with Professor Waldschmidt-Nelson in April 2021. Interview: Marietheres PirngruberTranslation: Erik Brown … Continue reading Transatlantic Connections of the Women’s Movement in the Long 19th Century: Interview with Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson

Germans Go Subtropical: Migration and the Quest for Environmental-Climatic Knowledge in South America

German migration in subtropical South America began in the early nineteenth century. It lasted for almost 150 years and shaped one of the most extensive projects of transnational forest colonization and global agricultural exchange in history. This experience catalyzed the formation of different bodies of knowledge, many of them currently either lost or “fugitive,” as … Continue reading Germans Go Subtropical: Migration and the Quest for Environmental-Climatic Knowledge in South America

The post Germans Go Subtropical: Migration and the Quest for Environmental-Climatic Knowledge in South America appeared first on History of Knowledge.

A Seminar about Information History: Why?

On May 18th, I hosted a seminar about information history, a topic that seems to have gained momentum in recent years. My interest in information as a historical phenomenon began as an attempt to inquire into the prehistory of the Danish public libraries.1 For some years, I have also had a strong interest in the … Continue reading A Seminar about Information History: Why?

The post A Seminar about Information History: Why? appeared first on History of Knowledge.

The Dr. Seuss Controversy and the Serious Business of Curating Knowledge of the World for Children

On March 2, 2021, the 117th birthday of Theodor Geisel, the children’s book author and illustrator behind the Dr. Seuss pseudonym, Dr. Seuss Enterprises announced that it would “cease publication and licensing” of six titles in its collection because the listed books “portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong.”1 A new battle in … Continue reading The Dr. Seuss Controversy and the Serious Business of Curating Knowledge of the World for Children

The post The Dr. Seuss Controversy and the Serious Business of Curating Knowledge of the World for Children appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Online Seminar: Bureaucracy as Knowledge

History of Knowledge Seminar Series @ Utrecht University “Bureaucracy as Knowledge” with Christine von Oertzen (MPIWG, Berlin) and Sebastian Felten (University of Vienna) Thursday, June 10, 2021, 15:30-17:00 (CET) Online via Microsoft Teams (registration not required) Bureaucracy was a term of critique that in Europe around 1900 became an analytical concept for world-historical comparison, most … Continue reading Online Seminar: Bureaucracy as Knowledge

The post Online Seminar: Bureaucracy as Knowledge appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Knowledge Notes: Calls and Events

Calls Publication: Cripping the Archive: Disability, Power, and History, edited by Jenifer Barclay and Stefanie Hunt-Kennedy. – Deadline: June 14, 2021. – FYI: What “Cripping” Means. Conference: Making the Social World Objective: Theoretical, Practical, and Visual Forms of Social and Economic Knowledge, 1850-2000. – University of Zurich, November 10–11, 2021. – Deadline: June 15, 2021. … Continue reading Knowledge Notes: Calls and Events

The post Knowledge Notes: Calls and Events appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Transatlantische Verflechtungen der Frauenbewegung im langen 19. Jahrhundert: Interview mit Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson

Als Teil ihrer Blogserie zur Geschichte der Frauenbewegung in transatlantischer Perspektive hat sich Marietheres Pirngruber mit Professor Waldschmidt-Nelson im April 2021 unterhalten. Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson ist seit 2016 Lehrstuhlinhaberin für die Geschichte des Europäisch-Transatlantischen Kulturraums an der Universität Augsburg. Zuvor war sie fünf Jahre lang als stellvertretende Direktorin des Deutschen Historischen Instituts in Washington, D.C. tätig. Ihre Forschungsschwerpunkte liegen …

Explain Yourself: Visual Communication in Early Modern Printed Calendars

There is a curious subgenre of printed calendars in early modern Europe called Bauernkalender. Bauer in German refers to a farmer or peasant, so we might literally translate the name of this genre as “farmers’ calendars” or “peasant calendars.” That is not to say they are in any way simple. You know one when you … Continue reading Explain Yourself: Visual Communication in Early Modern Printed Calendars

The post Explain Yourself: Visual Communication in Early Modern Printed Calendars appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Debating New Approaches to Histories of the Sciences

All are invited to attend the online symposium “Debating New Approaches to Histories of the Sciences,” organized as part of the History of Knowledge Seminar Series @ Utrecht University. Friday, May 21, 2021, 9:30–17:30 CET Online via Microsoft Teams (registration not required) Recent decades have seen the emergence of a number of promising new approaches … Continue reading Debating New Approaches to Histories of the Sciences

The post Debating New Approaches to Histories of the Sciences appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Knowledge Notes: Upcoming Events

Workshop: What Does South-to-South Mean for Cold War Science and Technology in Asia? – Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin – May 10, 2021, 4:00–6:30 p.m. CET This workshop examines the role and significance of science and technology at the intersections of post-colonial, post-empire, and Cold-War dynamics in Asia, with a focus … Continue reading Knowledge Notes: Upcoming Events

The post Knowledge Notes: Upcoming Events appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search