Kategorie: DHI Washington

The World Wide Web of Internationalism: Evaluating Total Digital Access for the League of Nations Archive (LONTAD) and Its Potential for Historical Research

By Valentin Loos Editorial Note: Having gained his bachelor‘s degree in 2020, Valentin Loos is now a master‘s student of history and English and American studies at Osnabrück University. His interests include 19th to 21st century migration literature as a form of knowledge production, the history of I(N)GOS as well as the history of transnational migrant regimes. He completed his internship at the GHI Washington, DC, in the fall and winter of 2022. On 10 January 1920, the League of Nations, one of the … Continue reading The World Wide Web of Internationalism: Evaluating Total Digital Access for the League of Nations Archive (LONTAD) and Its Potential for Historical Research

History of Knowledge at the Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association in Philadelphia

The History of Knowledge will be featured in several panels at the 136th Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association in Philadelphia from January 5-8, 2023. If you’ll be attending, please check out some of the sessions below. One of this blog’s editors, Mario Peters, is also presenting, so feel free to find him at … Continue reading History of Knowledge at the Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association in Philadelphia

The post History of Knowledge at the Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association in Philadelphia appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Visiting PACSCL – Part Two: How to Organize a Consortium

By Tim Feindt In part one of my series on PACSCL I visited the Joseph P. Horner Memorial Library in Philadelphia and talked to Bettina Hess from the German Society of Pennsylvania about challenges and chances, trying to fathom the perspective of a small member of the Philadelphia Area Consortium of Special Collections Libraries (PACSCL). To complete the picture, I also wanted to capture  an overarching  perspective that can provide insights in the overall structure of the PACSCL network. I met Beth Lander, who … Continue reading Visiting PACSCL – Part Two: How to Organize a Consortium

Knowledge Notes

If you are going to the American Historical Association Annual Meeting in Philadelphia from January 5-8, 2023, please look for Section 128, “Infrastructure, Knowledge, and US Imperialism in the Americas, c. 1890-1970,” Friday, January 6th, 3:30-5, in the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. It will feature a presentation by GHI Research Fellow and History of Knowledge Blog … Continue reading Knowledge Notes

The post Knowledge Notes appeared first on History of Knowledge.

‘I beg you again from my heart to help me find my sister’: RELICO and the Need for Knowledge

Editor’s note: As has previously been mentioned on this blog, our sister blog, Migrant Knowledge, also always bears some relevance to the history of knowledge. This is not surprising since, as that blog’s motto points out, it seeks to “writ[ e] knowledge into the history of migration and migration into the history of knowledge.” In … Continue reading ‘I beg you again from my heart to help me find my sister’: RELICO and the Need for Knowledge

The post ‘I beg you again from my heart to help me find my sister’: RELICO and the Need for Knowledge appeared first on History of Knowledge.

African American Lucumí Devotees’ Adoption and Adaptation of African Diasporic Religious Knowledge in the U.S.

This short piece traces how the Black Power era affected the unfolding of the transmission of African diasporic religious knowledge and how it contributed to the evolution of specifically African American variations of Lucumí in the U.S. Most historical studies examining the influence of the Black Power movement on religious expression in the U.S. focus … Continue reading African American Lucumí Devotees’ Adoption and Adaptation of African Diasporic Religious Knowledge in the U.S.

The post African American Lucumí Devotees’ Adoption and Adaptation of African Diasporic Religious Knowledge in the U.S. appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Online access to historical German TV programs: Reflections on the research potential of unique audiovisual sources

By Christoph Eisele Editorial note: Christoph Eisele is in the final phase of completing his master’s degree in history (focusing on modern history) at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, where he also received his bachelor’s degree in history in 2020. His master’s thesis focuses on transnational and global connections between the film industry in Hollywood and Munich since the 1960s. From August to November 2022, he held an internship at the GHI in Washington, DC. He wrote this article to mark World Audiovisual Heritage Day … Continue reading Online access to historical German TV programs: Reflections on the research potential of unique audiovisual sources

Zugang zu historischen TV Beiträgen durch das Deutsche Rundfunkarchiv: Reflektionen zum Forschungspotential

Von Christoph Eisele Editorische Notiz: Christoph Eisele steht kurz vor dem Abschluss seines Masterstudiums in Neuerer Geschichte an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, wo er 2020 auch seinen Bachelor in Geschichte gemacht hat.  In seiner bereits abgeschlossenen Masterarbeit beschäftigt er sich mit den transnationalen und globalen Verbindungen zwischen der Filmindustrie in Hollywood, Kalifornien und München seit den 1960er Jahren. Von August bis November 2022 absolviert er ein Praktikum am GHI in Washington, DC. Diesen Beitrag hat er  zum Anlass des World Audiovisual Heritage Days am 27. … Continue reading Zugang zu historischen TV Beiträgen durch das Deutsche Rundfunkarchiv: Reflektionen zum Forschungspotential

New Book from the Network: Central European Jewish Socialist Refugees in the US

Joseph Malherek has recently published the book Free-Market Socialists with Central European University Press. He also contributed an article to Dynamics of Emigration, edited by Stefan Berger and Philipp Müller and published by Berghahn Books.

The post New Book from the Network: Central European Jewish Socialist Refugees in the US first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Bounded Rationality and the History of Knowledge

A Frontier in the History of Knowledge In September 2021, Peter Burke gave a talk at Lund University in which he spoke about the challenges that historians of knowledge face as we attempt to understand not only what was known in the past, but what people did with their knowledge. One approach to this puzzle, … Continue reading Bounded Rationality and the History of Knowledge

The post Bounded Rationality and the History of Knowledge appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Historical Newspapers. The Zeit.Punkt NRW-Portal

By Linda Rath Editorial note: Linda Rath graduated with a bachelor’s degree in history from the Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf in 2022. Her interests include the history of medicine and epidemics in the early 20th century and the socio-political aspects of power and power structures in the European Middle Ages. She completed her internship at the GHI Washington, DC, in the fall of 2022. Working with historical source materials is the bread and butter of any historian. When I started studying history at the university, however, … Continue reading Historical Newspapers. The Zeit.Punkt NRW-Portal

Visiting PACSCL – Part 1: Facing Digital Transformations Together

By Tim Feind Editorial note: Tim Feind completed his bachelor studies in Leipzig and is in the final phase of his  master studies in History at the University of Vienna in Austria. His main interests are in social and economic history, women and gender history since the 18th century, and theories and structures of punishment in historical perspective. Active in student government, he is also interested in political questions related to the working conditions in the academic field. He completed an internship at the … Continue reading Visiting PACSCL – Part 1: Facing Digital Transformations Together

Human Genetics with(out) Eugenic Knowledge? Towards a History of Knowledge about Human Heredity in West Germany

Since 1945, no German book on eugenics has been published. However, during two decades of reconstruction of the science of human genetics, which is fundamental to eugenics, the problems of eugenics repeatedly came to the fore and were discussed lively in wide circles.1 In the preface to his monograph Eugenik. Kommende Generationen in der Sicht … Continue reading Human Genetics with(out) Eugenic Knowledge? Towards a History of Knowledge about Human Heredity in West Germany

The post Human Genetics with(out) Eugenic Knowledge? Towards a History of Knowledge about Human Heredity in West Germany appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Glimpses into a History of Knowledge on the Antimalarial Lariam® in Zambia

You may have heard of the antimalarial agent mefloquine during the Covid-19 pandemic, as scientists suggested repurposing the drug to combat the novel coronavirus. Most drugs are developed for the body of a 27-year-old male Caucasian, and so was this antimalarial. Mefloquine was discovered in the Antimalaria Drug Discovery Program—the biggest program of its kind—launched … Continue reading Glimpses into a History of Knowledge on the Antimalarial Lariam® in Zambia

The post Glimpses into a History of Knowledge on the Antimalarial Lariam® in Zambia appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Organizing Impulses: Reframing Adventure as Global Knowledge for Young Readers in Precolonial Germany (1841–1862)

“The role of the educator is to rhythmize the soul to [moral] virtue.”1 This conclusion to his 1841 faculty address to the Königliche Realschule zu Berlin captures the spirit of Theodor Dielitz’s educational philosophy. As a teacher, Dielitz advocated systematic instruction about the real world to prepare students for a harmonious, moral life within the … Continue reading Organizing Impulses: Reframing Adventure as Global Knowledge for Young Readers in Precolonial Germany (1841–1862)

The post Organizing Impulses: Reframing Adventure as Global Knowledge for Young Readers in Precolonial Germany (1841–1862) appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Interview about the Relaunch of the Hannah Arendt Papers

By Tobias Schweitzer Editorial note: Tobias Schweitzer recently finished his Bachelor/undergraduate studies in philosophy and political science at the University of Münster in Germany. His interests include the history of political thought, intellectual history of the 20th century, theories of history and historiography, as well as questions related to the work of Hannah Arendt. He completed an internship at the GHI Washington from April to July 2022. Barbara Bair is a curator and historian in the Manuscripts Division of the Library of Congress, where … Continue reading Interview about the Relaunch of the Hannah Arendt Papers

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search