Kategorie: DHI Washington

Drifting Along: Unemployment and Interwar Social Research, from Marienthal to Muncie

Crosspost from Migrant Knowledge In January of 1929, the husband-and-wife sociologists Robert and Helen Lynd published what would become a landmark work of popular ethnography called Middletown: A Study in Modern American Culture. The Lynds’ broadly accessible book presented an in-depth profile of the social and civic life in Muncie, Indiana, a “typical” American community … Continue reading Drifting Along: Unemployment and Interwar Social Research, from Marienthal to Muncie

The post Drifting Along: Unemployment and Interwar Social Research, from Marienthal to Muncie appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Drifting Along: Unemployment and Interwar Social Research, from Marienthal to Muncie

The author looks at the relationship between two famous early sociological community studies, „Middletown“ and „Marienthal.“ The latter became Paul Lazarsfeld’s „ticket out of Europe just as the continent was descending into fascism.“

The post Drifting Along: Unemployment and Interwar Social Research, from Marienthal to Muncie first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

“Research in local archives and the exchange with colleagues led to a shift of my research focus” – 5in10 with Mario Peters

Mario Peters is a Research Fellow in American and Transatlantic History at the GHI Washington. His current research interests are spread across the intersection of mobility studies, environmental history, and the study of Inter-American relations. In his new project, he examines the development of Pan-American transportation infrastructures between 1870 and 1970, focusing on the cooperation and exchange of knowledge between North American and Latin American experts who contributed to the planning and construction of these infrastructures.

„Acclimated to Yellow Fever“

Das historische Konzept des Immunkapitals und seine Bedeutung für die afroamerikanische Minderheit in den USA – ein Gespräch mit der Historikerin Elisabeth Engel, die seit 2014 als Fellow am Deutschen Historischen Institut Washington forscht. Dieses Interview erscheint parallel in der aktuellen Ausgabe unseres Magazins „Weltweit vor Ort“ 02/20.

Interview with Digital History Fellow Jana Keck

We would like to extend a warm welcome to our new Digital History Fellow Jana Keck. Her fields of research include German and American Literature and Culture in the Nineteenth Century, Periodical Studies, and Digital Humanities. She began her academic career at the University of Stuttgart, where she studied English and Linguistics. In 2017 she received her Master’s from the University of Stuttgart with her thesis “Gottfried Duden’s Bericht über eine Reise nach den westlichen Staaten Nordamerikas (1829) and Its Emigration Stimulus.” In the same … Continue reading Interview with Digital History Fellow Jana Keck

Not a Given Object: What Historians Can Learn from the Reflexive Turn in Migration Studies

„Migration“ is not a stable, preexisting category but rather a product of societal processes that shape what the term comprises. We must take these entanglements with the past into account in our present-day research.

The post Not a Given Object: What Historians Can Learn from the Reflexive Turn in Migration Studies first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

GiD Lab: Interviewreihe – Folge 2 mit Claudia Roesch und Axel Jansen

Für die zweite Folge unserer Interviewreihe „Schöne neue Welt? – Chancen und Grenzen medizinischen Fortschritts in Geschichte und Gegenwart“ hat der Wissenschaftsjournalist Dr. Jan-Martin Wiarda mit Dr. Axel Jansen und Dr. Claudia Roesch gesprochen. Das Interview gibt’s nun zum Anschauen hier auf dem Blog.

GiD Lab: Interviewreihe – Claudia Roesch und Axel Jansen stellen sich vor

Die GiD-Interviewreihe „Schöne neue Welt? – Chancen und Grenzen medizinischen Fortschritts in Geschichte und Gegenwart“ geht in die zweite Runde. In diesem Beitrag erfahrt ihr, wer Claudia Roesch und Axel Jansen sind, zu welchen Themen sie forschen und wie ihr eure Fragen an sie stellen könnt.

readme.txt: „The World of Children: Foreign Cultures in Nineteenth-Century German Education and Entertainment“

Lesen, Schreiben und Publizieren sind die Essenz von “Geisteswissenschaften als Beruf”. In dieser Folge von readme.txt stellt Simone Lässig, Direktorin des Deutschen Historischen Instituts in Washington, ihren zusammen mit Andreas Weiß herausgegebenen Band „World of Children: Foreign Cultures in Nineteenth-Century German Education and Entertainment“ vor.

Social Media as a Distinct Form of Knowledge Production

When I started blogging in 2016, I had not been an active reader of blogs. I liked the idea of reaching out to a broader public by blogging about my research project on the eponymously titled Migration and Belonging, not least because it was publicly funded, but what exactly would it mean to blog as … Continue reading Social Media as a Distinct Form of Knowledge Production

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search