Kategorie: Rezension

A posthumous publication: Frank Martin’s “Camillo Rusconi: ein Bildhauer des Spätbarock in Rom” (2019)

When recently I took Frank Martin’s posthumously published book off the shelf at the Warburg Institute I was pursuing issues relating to eighteenth-century Italian sculpture, in particular the making and use of models. But the book attracted me also on a personal level. Frank Martin died unexpectedly at the age of 53 in 2014. I knew him well from periods when we had worked at the same institutions, in 1993 at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence, where he was a postdoctoral fellow, and again in 1996 at the Warburg Institute, where he held a three-month Frances Yates Fellowship.

‘The Political and the Epistemic’ in ‘KNOW’

The Fall 2020 issue of KNOW focuses on a specific theme: „The Political and the Epistemic in the Twentieth Century: Historical Perspectives.“ Emphasizing the first half of the twentieth century, in particular, guest editors Kijan Espahangizi and Monika Wulz point to an emerging „politicized understanding of scientific inquiry“ in the interwar period, which „shaped a … Continue reading ‘The Political and the Epistemic’ in ‘KNOW’

The post ‘The Political and the Epistemic’ in ‘KNOW’ appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Book Review: The Routledge Handbook of Transregional Studies

By Jeremy Adelman. A few years ago, I organized a symposium at Princeton University. The theme was: does globalization mean that the social sciences (broadly defined) need to rethink their intellectual foundations? In the end, we came to a draw. Some felt that old models and familiar framings worked fine. Others saw global integration as an intellectual shakeup of the bedrock of methodological nationalism.

Weniger Schlachtengeschichte, mehr Kriegserfahrungen – Überblick zu neuen deutschsprachigen Gesamtdarstellungen zum Krieg 1870/71

Jahrestage und Jubiläen sind nicht nur Anlass für öffentliches Gedenken. Sie können zugleich anregen, ein bestimmtes Ereignis mit neuem Quellenmaterial unter einem frischen Blickwinkel zu betrachten, Forschungslücken zu schließen oder mit einer modernen Synthese…

Book Review: A. Getachew: Worldmaking after Empire

By Christopher J. Lee. Worldmaking after Empire is a study of political thought and institution building during the twentieth century, with a specific focus on black Anglophone leaders and intellectuals such as W. E. B. Du Bois, George Padmore, Kwame Nkrumah, Michael Manley, and Julius Nyerere. The central argument of the book is that the anticolonialism they promoted was not solely concerned with national self-determination and the establishment of nation-states.

Reading Tip: ‘The Book That Would Not Die’

Donna Gabaccia reflects on the reception of William Foote Whyte’s famous Street Corner Society at the Migrant Knowledge blog: William Foote Whyte’s study of Italian immigrants in the North End of Boston was not particularly successful after its release in 1943. In the years after 1970, though, Street Corner Society garnered great success and became, … Continue reading Reading Tip: ‘The Book That Would Not Die’

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search