Kategorie: Artikel

Stichtag 4. Juni 1619: Der Bischof von Augsburg schreibt an Maximilian

Während sich in Böhmen die Situation verschärfte, planten die katholischen Reichsstände sich erneut zu organisieren. Im Laufe des Mai 1619 hatte es in München eine Zusammenkunft gegeben, an der u.a. Vertreter der Hochstifte Würzburg und Augsburg teilnahmen: Klares Ziel war … Weiterlesen

The Politics of Measurement: Knowledge about Economic Inequality in the United Kingdom and Beyond since 1945

If you had a conversation about the growing gap between rich and poor almost anywhere in today’s world, you would very likely refer to “the top one percent,” a phrase that evokes the skyrocketing wealth of the superrich. A similar conversation in West Germany in the 1970s or 1980s would have revolved around the latest … Continue reading The Politics of Measurement: Knowledge about Economic Inequality in the United Kingdom and Beyond since 1945

Knowledge about Democratic Silence: Political Science and the Rise of Electoral Abstention in Postwar Switzerland (1945–1989)

In recent decades, a diagnosis of democratic crisis or even of a post-democratic condition has emerged in public debate in many Western states. The rise of electoral abstention, particularly since the 1970s and 1980s, often serves as statistical evidence for this assessment.1 Yet what exactly can abstention tell us about the state of democracy? My … Continue reading Knowledge about Democratic Silence: Political Science and the Rise of Electoral Abstention in Postwar Switzerland (1945–1989)

Knowing Otherwise: The Transatlantic Travels of Creative Thinking Expertise in the 1950s

Brainstorming as a way to organize ideation was first practiced in the United States in 1938 in the advertising firm Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn (BBDO). One partner, Alex Osborn, later described it as “using the brain to storm a problem,” adding that it should be done “in commando fashion.”1 As a method for thinking … Continue reading Knowing Otherwise: The Transatlantic Travels of Creative Thinking Expertise in the 1950s

Mind the Gap: Cultural Cleavage and the Idea of the ‘Common People’

A specter is haunting the current political discourse, the specter of cultural cleavage. More and more observers see the emergence of a socio-cultural gap between a hegemonic, globalist, educated class and an underrepresented, locally anchored underclass. The titles of two studies speak volumes: Cleavage Politics and the Populist Right (2010) by sociologist Simon Bornschier, and … Continue reading Mind the Gap: Cultural Cleavage and the Idea of the ‘Common People’

„Sozial- und Geisteswissenschaftler brauchen ihr Licht wahrlich nicht unter den Scheffel zu stellen“

Geisteswissenschaft als Beruf im Ausland – Was kann man sich darunter vorstellen? In „Weltweit vor Ort“, dem Magazin der MWS, geben Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler einen Einblick in das spannende Arbeitsfeld der internationalen geisteswissenschaftlichen Forschung. In diesem Beitrag interviewt Hanna Pletziger (Referentin für Öffentlichkeitsarbeit in der Geschäftsstelle der MWS), Swen Schulz (SPD), Politologe und seit 2002 Mitglied des Deutschen Bundestages zu seiner Arbeit im Bundestag, zur Rolle der Geisteswissenschaften und die Arbeit der Max Weber Stiftung.

Projecting ‘World Government’: The Creation of the League of Nations as a Case Study in International Policy-Making

The postwar was, as it often is, a projecting age. Following World War One, political, military, thought, and other leaders resolved to prevent such a catastrophe from ever occurring again. Projects proposed at the Paris peace talks were many and varied in origin, scale, ideology, and so on. More significant, though, was an overarching commonality … Continue reading Projecting ‘World Government’: The Creation of the League of Nations as a Case Study in International Policy-Making

State Knowledge in Central Europe after 1848

What do governments know? When and why have they generated knowledge about themselves, sovereign territories, the functioning of bureaucracies, legal systems, and the effectiveness of legislation? In other words, how have officials made that capacious concept we call the state legible? State knowledge took on heightened importance in Central Europe in the nineteenth century with … Continue reading State Knowledge in Central Europe after 1848

Queer Ancestry as a Problem of Knowledge in Early 20th-Century Germany

Frederick the Great (1712–1786) was not a homosexual. Or so claimed the German physician and amateur medical historian Gaston Vorberg in 1921. Scurrilous rumors about the sexual desires of the legendary Prussian monarch had circulated ever since the eighteenth century. Vorberg sought to debunk them using the tools of critical scholarship and source analysis. In … Continue reading Queer Ancestry as a Problem of Knowledge in Early 20th-Century Germany

Identifying “Indians”: Racial Taxonomy as a Settler Colonial Politics of Knowledge

Canada’s definition and documentation of “Indians” is a project of bureaucratic knowledge production in service of the continued assertion of settler colonial political visions.1 The Indian Act was introduced in 1876 to assert the terms of the political relationship between the Dominion of Canada and certain peoples the Act defines as “Indians.” The Act has … Continue reading Identifying “Indians”: Racial Taxonomy as a Settler Colonial Politics of Knowledge