Kategorie: Wissensgeschichte

History of Knowledge at the Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association in Philadelphia

The History of Knowledge will be featured in several panels at the 136th Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association in Philadelphia from January 5-8, 2023. If you’ll be attending, please check out some of the sessions below. One of this blog’s editors, Mario Peters, is also presenting, so feel free to find him at … Continue reading History of Knowledge at the Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association in Philadelphia

The post History of Knowledge at the Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association in Philadelphia appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Knowledge Notes

If you are going to the American Historical Association Annual Meeting in Philadelphia from January 5-8, 2023, please look for Section 128, “Infrastructure, Knowledge, and US Imperialism in the Americas, c. 1890-1970,” Friday, January 6th, 3:30-5, in the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. It will feature a presentation by GHI Research Fellow and History of Knowledge Blog … Continue reading Knowledge Notes

The post Knowledge Notes appeared first on History of Knowledge.

‘I beg you again from my heart to help me find my sister’: RELICO and the Need for Knowledge

Editor’s note: As has previously been mentioned on this blog, our sister blog, Migrant Knowledge, also always bears some relevance to the history of knowledge. This is not surprising since, as that blog’s motto points out, it seeks to “writ[ e] knowledge into the history of migration and migration into the history of knowledge.” In … Continue reading ‘I beg you again from my heart to help me find my sister’: RELICO and the Need for Knowledge

The post ‘I beg you again from my heart to help me find my sister’: RELICO and the Need for Knowledge appeared first on History of Knowledge.

African American Lucumí Devotees’ Adoption and Adaptation of African Diasporic Religious Knowledge in the U.S.

This short piece traces how the Black Power era affected the unfolding of the transmission of African diasporic religious knowledge and how it contributed to the evolution of specifically African American variations of Lucumí in the U.S. Most historical studies examining the influence of the Black Power movement on religious expression in the U.S. focus … Continue reading African American Lucumí Devotees’ Adoption and Adaptation of African Diasporic Religious Knowledge in the U.S.

The post African American Lucumí Devotees’ Adoption and Adaptation of African Diasporic Religious Knowledge in the U.S. appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Bounded Rationality and the History of Knowledge

A Frontier in the History of Knowledge In September 2021, Peter Burke gave a talk at Lund University in which he spoke about the challenges that historians of knowledge face as we attempt to understand not only what was known in the past, but what people did with their knowledge. One approach to this puzzle, … Continue reading Bounded Rationality and the History of Knowledge

The post Bounded Rationality and the History of Knowledge appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Human Genetics with(out) Eugenic Knowledge? Towards a History of Knowledge about Human Heredity in West Germany

Since 1945, no German book on eugenics has been published. However, during two decades of reconstruction of the science of human genetics, which is fundamental to eugenics, the problems of eugenics repeatedly came to the fore and were discussed lively in wide circles.1 In the preface to his monograph Eugenik. Kommende Generationen in der Sicht … Continue reading Human Genetics with(out) Eugenic Knowledge? Towards a History of Knowledge about Human Heredity in West Germany

The post Human Genetics with(out) Eugenic Knowledge? Towards a History of Knowledge about Human Heredity in West Germany appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Glimpses into a History of Knowledge on the Antimalarial Lariam® in Zambia

You may have heard of the antimalarial agent mefloquine during the Covid-19 pandemic, as scientists suggested repurposing the drug to combat the novel coronavirus. Most drugs are developed for the body of a 27-year-old male Caucasian, and so was this antimalarial. Mefloquine was discovered in the Antimalaria Drug Discovery Program—the biggest program of its kind—launched … Continue reading Glimpses into a History of Knowledge on the Antimalarial Lariam® in Zambia

The post Glimpses into a History of Knowledge on the Antimalarial Lariam® in Zambia appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Organizing Impulses: Reframing Adventure as Global Knowledge for Young Readers in Precolonial Germany (1841–1862)

“The role of the educator is to rhythmize the soul to [moral] virtue.”1 This conclusion to his 1841 faculty address to the Königliche Realschule zu Berlin captures the spirit of Theodor Dielitz’s educational philosophy. As a teacher, Dielitz advocated systematic instruction about the real world to prepare students for a harmonious, moral life within the … Continue reading Organizing Impulses: Reframing Adventure as Global Knowledge for Young Readers in Precolonial Germany (1841–1862)

The post Organizing Impulses: Reframing Adventure as Global Knowledge for Young Readers in Precolonial Germany (1841–1862) appeared first on History of Knowledge.

‘Will They Become Human?’ Romanies and Re-education Knowledge in Postwar Czechoslovakia

“We are building a socialist order for the happy present and future of today’s and future generations.” This is what Václav Nosek, the Minister of the Interior, told his fellow party members at the beginning of the Ninth Congress of the Czechoslovak Communist Party in May 1949.1 His words exemplify how the formation of communist … Continue reading ‘Will They Become Human?’ Romanies and Re-education Knowledge in Postwar Czechoslovakia

The post ‘Will They Become Human?’ Romanies and Re-education Knowledge in Postwar Czechoslovakia appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Blogging Migrant Knowledge – Part II

Migrant knowledge is not so much a concept as it is a research agenda.1 It can foster work on what migrants know about their world, and it challenges us to think more about what societies, including states, know about migrants. In Part I of my reflections on our sister blog, Migrant Knowledge, I highlighted posts … Continue reading Blogging Migrant Knowledge – Part II

The post Blogging Migrant Knowledge – Part II appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Knowledge Notes: Books and Archives

Check out “A Motherland of Books: An Essay by Maria Bloshteyn” at Punctured Lines, a blog devoted to “post-Soviet literature in and outside the former Soviet Union.” Written just before the war in Ukraine began, this essay elegizes the home libraries lovingly gathered and treasured by their owners in the Soviet era, these very libraries, … Continue reading Knowledge Notes: Books and Archives

The post Knowledge Notes: Books and Archives appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Digital Humanities and History Event Next Week in Hybrid Format

The Fifth Annual GHI Conference on Digital Humanities and Digital History, titled “Datafication in the Historical Humanities: Reconsidering Traditional Understandings of Sources and Data,” will take place in an accessible hybrid format next week from June 2 to June 4. You can register to attend two keynotes as well as other sessions on the conference … Continue reading Digital Humanities and History Event Next Week in Hybrid Format

The post Digital Humanities and History Event Next Week in Hybrid Format appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Two Research Assistant Positions

The University of Konstanz has two 50% research assistant positions in the History of Knowledge / History of Alternative Education. Each position within the ERUA Research Group “Reimagining Higher Education and Research” runs until end of 2023 with a possible extension for an additional year, subject to availability of funds. Application deadline: March 31, 2022. … Continue reading Two Research Assistant Positions

The post Two Research Assistant Positions appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Indigenous Value Systems as Vessels for Knowledge: An Example from the Pacific Northwest

“It may safely be said,” wrote naturalist and U.S. Commissioner for Fisheries Spencer Fullerton Baird in 1878, “that wherever the white man plants his foot and the so-called civilization of a country is begun, inhabitants of the air, land, and the water, begin to disappear.” Particularly salmon at the heart of the thriving Pacific Northwest … Continue reading Indigenous Value Systems as Vessels for Knowledge: An Example from the Pacific Northwest

The post Indigenous Value Systems as Vessels for Knowledge: An Example from the Pacific Northwest appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Knowledge Notes

CALL: Dialogic Memories of the 1970-90s “Transitions” across the World: Current Practices and Possible Solidarities. This is an online component of the Memory Studies Association conference in Seoul this summer. organized by the working group on post-socialist and comparative memory studies within the framework of the research project Reconstituting Publics through Remembering Transitions. Event: July … Continue reading Knowledge Notes

The post Knowledge Notes appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Blogging Migrant Knowledge – Part I

A lot of interesting material has been published over at Migrant Knowledge since its inception nearly three years ago. If the material could just as easily have found a home here, it was produced for our sister website as part of a specific research program linked to a broad network of scholars, on the one … Continue reading Blogging Migrant Knowledge – Part I

The post Blogging Migrant Knowledge – Part I appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search