Kategorie: Wissensgeschichte

Die verschlungenen Pfade der Wissenmigration

Wie sind die intellektuellen Konzepte Kapitalismus und Kommunismus nach Ostasien gelangt? Und wie beeinflussten europäische Lesarten von „Asien“ japanische Chinadiskurse? Yufei Zhou hat die Verflechtungen der epistemischen Triangel Europa-Japan-China entwirrt. Die Arbeiten der in Japan tätigen chinesischen Wissenschaftshistorikerin zeigen beispielhaft, wie komplex und mehrdimensional sich globale Wissenstransfers im 20. Jahrhundert gestalteten.

Chinese-European Lecture No. 200

Reaping the Benefits of Water: A Political Epistemology of Shuili (1000–1100) (Xu Chun) In the eleventh century, the language of shuili, or “reaping the benefits of water”, gained political salience. This research situates the concept of shuili in the context of the Xifeng Reforms, foregrounding the practical knowledges and technologies that informed the particular meanings of shuili. The reformists’ idea that the state should actively reap the benefits of water, among other resources Heaven and Earth could offer, symbolizes a rearticulation of statecraft since the […]

Provenance Research and Attribution Knowledge of Ancient Middle Eastern Art

Until the 1990s, provenance research, or the history of ownership, was mainly conducted to determine the attribution and authenticity of an artwork. Provenance research grew significantly after the Washington Principles of 1998 and the accompanying increased awareness of the issues surrounding Holocaust-era art theft in Europe. Museums are also committed to documenting transfers of ownership … Continue reading Provenance Research and Attribution Knowledge of Ancient Middle Eastern Art

The post Provenance Research and Attribution Knowledge of Ancient Middle Eastern Art appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Upcoming Events

Elaine Leong is speaking tomorrow on “Vernacular Medicine and ‘Agents of Knowledge’ in Late Seventeenth-Century London” as part of the History of Knowledge Seminar Series @ Utrecht University. The event is online, November 24, 2021, 3:30–5:00 pm CET. 🔗 Details The Volkskundemuseum Wien is holding a conference to think about its photograph collection. “Reimagining One’s Own: … Continue reading Upcoming Events

The post Upcoming Events appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Retracing Professional Mobility: Historical Network Analysis through CERD

By Thorben Pelzer. If sinology was a religion (which, despite its dogmas, it probably is not), the 15-volume Cambridge History of China could well serve as its holy scripture. Published over the course of over forty years, each of its well over a hundred chapters provides an authoritative overview of a particular topic.

The Environmental Turn in Postwar Sweden: A New History of Knowledge

In the summer of 1971, an eleven-year-old boy in Gothenburg, Sweden, wrote a letter to the pioneering environmentalist Hans Palmstierna. The boy had recently read a report on the environment in a youth magazine and was shocked. “Is our little Tellus really in such bad shape?,” he asked, adding that it was terrible that there … Continue reading The Environmental Turn in Postwar Sweden: A New History of Knowledge

The post The Environmental Turn in Postwar Sweden: A New History of Knowledge appeared first on History of Knowledge.

“Gender, Sexuality, and Knowledge Production in Current Neoliberal and Authoritarian Regimes”: Call for Contributions to the Series

To highlight the ongoing struggles that shape the production and circulation of knowledge in times of neoliberalism and authoritarianism, the Interdisciplinary Gender and Sexuality Research Cluster of De Montfort University, the Margherita-von-Brentano Center of Freie Universität Berlin, and Academy in Exile are calling for blog contributions by scholars, students, and activists from across the globe.

What the History of Astronomy Can Teach Us about the Unknown

Humanity has long wished to know the universe. This desire has been present in nearly every civilization, culture, or community of human beings. Knowing the universe has always been extremely challenging, notwithstanding diverse approaches to the task—scientific reasoning, ancestral respect, the identification and worship of divinities, to name but a few. Nevertheless, there is a … Continue reading What the History of Astronomy Can Teach Us about the Unknown

The post What the History of Astronomy Can Teach Us about the Unknown appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Knowledge Notes: Calls

Knowledge is not explicitly referenced in the following four calls, but their cultural and practice-oriented framings certainly lend themselves to proposals informed by the history of knowledge. The History of Women, Religion, and Emotions, June 24–26, 2022, in-person, Indiana University Europe Gateway in Berlin, Germany. Proposal deadline: October 15, 2021. Die jüdische Familie in der … Continue reading Knowledge Notes: Calls

The post Knowledge Notes: Calls appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Knowledge Notes: Upcoming Deadlines

The following call, in German, is about memory and narrative, which means it’s also about public history and, implicitly, public knowledge of Germany’s Nazi past: Conference: Gedenkstättengeschichte(n). KZ-Gedenkstätten in postnationalsozialistischen Gesellschaften von 1945 bis heute – Bestandsaufnahme und Perspektiven, February 16–18, 2022, Hamburg. Deadline: September 30, 2021. Another conference that looks at historical narratives in … Continue reading Knowledge Notes: Upcoming Deadlines

The post Knowledge Notes: Upcoming Deadlines appeared first on History of Knowledge.

‘Emotion Knowledge’ and Life Writing in English Military Memoirs, 1820s to 1840s

“It would be difficult,” the former officer George Gleig wrote in 1825, “to convey to the mind of an ordinary reader anything like a correct notion of the state of feeling which takes possession of a man waiting for the commencement of a battle.” Nonetheless, he tried to do just that. Time, Gleig asserted, “appears … Continue reading ‘Emotion Knowledge’ and Life Writing in English Military Memoirs, 1820s to 1840s

The post ‘Emotion Knowledge’ and Life Writing in English Military Memoirs, 1820s to 1840s appeared first on History of Knowledge.

The very first monthly astronomical journal in Germany: The Celestial Police and their structures of communication

By Janna Katharina Müller Editorial note: Janna Katharina Müller studies the history and theory of science and technology [“Theorie und Geschichte der Wissenschaft und Technik”] at the Technische Universität Berlin. She’s currently working on her Master’s thesis focusing on the emergence and formation of a concept of the newly discovered asteroids between Mars and Jupiter in the first years after their discovery, 1801–1813. The title of her thesis is: “Von Planeto-Cometen und planetarischen Fragmenten. Die Himmels-Polizey und Asteroidenforschung im frühen 19. Jahrhundert.“ In the … Continue reading The very first monthly astronomical journal in Germany: The Celestial Police and their structures of communication

Conference: “Contested Knowledge in a Connected World”

The conference “Contested Knowledge in a Connected World” brings together researchers from the large-scale research project “Knowledge Unbound: Internationalisation, Networking, Innovation in and by the Max Weber Stiftung”. The project is pursuing the aims of opening up innovative areas of research, strengthening the internationalisation of the foundation’s activity and expanding cooperation between the foundation’s institutes and external partners.

Invective Loops: How Shaming Migrants Shapes Knowledge Orders

The authors discuss disparagement practices using the “invectivity” approach developed at the TU Dresden. Shaming helps demarcate in-groups from out-groups, feeding communication loops and producing emotions beyond the immediate parties involved.

The post Invective Loops: How Shaming Migrants Shapes Knowledge Orders first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Louis Agassiz and the Classification of Brazil’s Fish

Louis Agassiz (1807–1873) was a young student at the University of Munich when Johann von Spix and Carl Friedrich von Martius returned from their expedition to Brazil. Among the many items and specimens the German naturalists brought back were fish. The methodology they had followed on their journey through what was then part of the … Continue reading Louis Agassiz and the Classification of Brazil’s Fish

The post Louis Agassiz and the Classification of Brazil’s Fish appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search