Kategorie: Migrationsgeschichte

Migrant Knowledge Notes 6

Marginalized Migrant Knowledge: The Reception of German-Speaking Refugee Historians in West Germany after 1945

Today we offer two examples of academic knowledge on the move in tandem with the Migrant Knowledge blog. Anna Corsten looks at the reception of two German-speaking refugee historians in West Germany, and Razak Khan discusses the place of certain travel experiences in Magnus Hirschfeld’s thought. In Germany today, Hans Rosenberg (1904–1988) and Raul Hilberg … Continue reading Marginalized Migrant Knowledge: The Reception of German-Speaking Refugee Historians in West Germany after 1945

Marginalized Migrant Knowledge: The Reception of German-Speaking Refugee Historians in West Germany after 1945

Anna Corsten examines the reception of two German-speaking refugee historians in West Germany, Hans Rosenberg and Raul Hilberg. In both cases, their work was initially marginalized, but later it entered the mainstream of German historiography. Why? What role did migration play in their work and its reception? (1,922 words)

Background Knowledge: Interrogating Perceptions of Smugglers with Joseph Roth

Allison Schmidt makes a case for not prejudging people smugglers in history or the testimony they left behind in state police records. Drawing on the suggestive observations of Joseph Roth, her example centers on Eastern and Central Europe in the interwar period, after the breakup of empires had changed the legal status and economic situation of so many people. (1,547 words)

Knowledge and Young Migrants

Now available at the University of Chicago Press Journals: “Knowledge and Young Migrants,” special issue of KNOW: A Journal on the Formation of Knowledge 3, no. 2 (Fall 2019): 191–351. Edited by Simone Lässig and Swen Steinberg.

  • “Why Young Migrants Matter in the History of Knowledge” by Simone Lässig and Swen Steinberg
  • “Child-Rearing as a Form of American Knowledge” by Paula S. Fass
  • “What Debora’s Letters Do: Producing Knowledge for the Basel Mission Family” by Simone Laqua-O’Donnell
  • “Between Two Worlds: Chinese Immigrant Children and the Production of Knowledge in the Era of Chinese Exclusion” by Wendy L. Rouse
  • “African Youth on the Move in Postwar Greater France: Experiential Knowledge and Decolonial Politics at the End of the Empire” by Emily Marker
  • “The Way to School between Two Worlds”: Documenting the Knowledge of Second-Generation Immigrant Children in Switzerland, 1977–1983″ by Kijan Espahangizi
  • “Young People’s Agency and the Production of Knowledge in Migration Processes: The Federal Republic of Germany after 1945” by Stephanie Zloch

Rebels against the Homeland: Turkish Guest Workers in 1980s West German Anthropology

Michelle Lynn Kahn revisits Werner Schiffauer’s 1991 classic Die Migranten aus Subay (The Migrants from Subay) and reminds us of “a crucial reality: migrants have lives of their own before they arrive in host societies, and they never cease to maintain ties, whether physical or emotional, to the homelands they leave behind.” (2,337 words)

Migrant Biographies as a Prism for Explaining Transnational Knowledge Transfers

Philipp Strobl thinks about how migrant biographies and autobiographies can be used to understand associated knowledge transfer processes, including their “success” or “failure.” Keywords include “new biography,” “actor centrism,” and “translation,” and the examples are from Australia after World War Two. (2,139 words)

Acquiring Knowledge About Migration: The Jewish Origins of Migration Studies

Tobias Brinkmann looks into how “studying Jewish migration” began “outside the academic sphere” in the 19th century. He also notes how a number of Jewish social scientists “[shaped] the conceptual foundations of migration studies in the United States during the middle decades of the twentieth century.” (2,282 words)

Migrant Knowledge Notes 5

Refuge and Refuse: Migrant Knowledge and Environmental Education in Germany

Joela Jacobs observes that “Migrant knowledge figures as a category of absence” in Europe. In Germany, one core issue is knowledge about recycling requirements and expectations. Efforts to teach it “betray an unreflective understanding of cultural identity”: knowing how to separate one’s trash serves as a marker of who belongs. (1,450 words)

Of Dodos, Cane, and Migrants: Networking Migrant Knowledge between Mauritius and Hawai’i in the 1860s


NICHOLAS B. MILLER: “Reconstituting the networks of the complex and mobile individuals through which indenture globally spread as a legal form of labor can sharpen our understanding of how migration practices and policies became universalized over the course of the nineteenth century, extending well beyond the framework of individual empires.” (1,745 words)

Following the Archives: Migrating Documents and their Changing Meanings

NICK UNDERWOOD reflects on how files he had expected to find in Paris for his study of Franco-Yiddishness during the interwar period had, in fact, migrated elsewhere. He uses his surprise to discuss the part played by rescued or stolen documents in “the migratory history of knowledge and knowledge-making.”