Kategorie: Migrationsgeschichte

Drifting Along: Unemployment and Interwar Social Research, from Marienthal to Muncie

Crosspost from Migrant Knowledge In January of 1929, the husband-and-wife sociologists Robert and Helen Lynd published what would become a landmark work of popular ethnography called Middletown: A Study in Modern American Culture. The Lynds’ broadly accessible book presented an in-depth profile of the social and civic life in Muncie, Indiana, a “typical” American community … Continue reading Drifting Along: Unemployment and Interwar Social Research, from Marienthal to Muncie

The post Drifting Along: Unemployment and Interwar Social Research, from Marienthal to Muncie appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Drifting Along: Unemployment and Interwar Social Research, from Marienthal to Muncie

The author looks at the relationship between two famous early sociological community studies, „Middletown“ and „Marienthal.“ The latter became Paul Lazarsfeld’s „ticket out of Europe just as the continent was descending into fascism.“

The post Drifting Along: Unemployment and Interwar Social Research, from Marienthal to Muncie first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Transatlantic Migrants and Knowledge in the U.S. Immigrant Press

The author discusses the source value of U.S. immigrant newspapers. If there are many reasons to approach them with caution, they can still help scholars learn „what migrants knew and wanted their fellow migrants to know…“

The post Transatlantic Migrants and Knowledge in the U.S. Immigrant Press first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Swedish Science and European French

Eighteenth-century Sweden was a scientific powerhouse. Its researchers gave their names to some of the most significant developments of the period, from the Linnaean system of binomial classification to the temperature metric established by Anders Celsius. But what if I told you that one secret to Sweden’s success was a German-speaking Protestant from Alsace? This … Continue reading Swedish Science and European French

Migrant Dreams: Egyptian Workers in the Gulf States

Interview with Samuli Schielke. Samuli Schielke’s latest book, Migrant Dreams: Egyptian Workers in the Gulf States (AUC Press, 2020), is a vivid ethnography of Egyptian migrants to the Arab Gulf states. It investigates the imagination that migration thrives on, and the hopes and ambitions generated by the repeated experience of leaving and returning home.

Exiled Among Nations: German and Mennonite Mythologies in a Transnational Age – Interview with John P.R. Eicher

Earlier this year, the monograph “Exiled Among Nations: German and Mennonite Mythologies in a Transnational Age” by John P.R. Eicher was published by Cambridge University Press, in the Publications of the German Historical Institute Series. We talked with the author about the origins of his book, the role of institutions for diasporic groups and links between his research and today’s world.

„Acclimated to Yellow Fever“

Das historische Konzept des Immunkapitals und seine Bedeutung für die afroamerikanische Minderheit in den USA – ein Gespräch mit der Historikerin Elisabeth Engel, die seit 2014 als Fellow am Deutschen Historischen Institut Washington forscht. Dieses Interview erscheint parallel in der aktuellen Ausgabe unseres Magazins „Weltweit vor Ort“ 02/20.

Reading Tip: ‘The Book That Would Not Die’

Donna Gabaccia reflects on the reception of William Foote Whyte’s famous Street Corner Society at the Migrant Knowledge blog: William Foote Whyte’s study of Italian immigrants in the North End of Boston was not particularly successful after its release in 1943. In the years after 1970, though, Street Corner Society garnered great success and became, … Continue reading Reading Tip: ‘The Book That Would Not Die’

From Hoyerswerda to Welcome Culture: Asylum and Integration Policy in the Federal Republic of Germany

Annette Lützel explains the FRG’s very different responses to the large numbers of refugees who came in the early 1990s and in 2015. Citing recent employment and job-training numbers, she sees an ongoing positive trend.

The post From Hoyerswerda to Welcome Culture: Asylum and Integration Policy in the Federal Republic of Germany first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Call: Doing Historical Research on Migration in the Digital Age

Lorella Viola and Machteld Venken at the Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History seek applications for a large panel on „Doing Historical Research on Migration in the Digital Age.“ Deadline: November 20, 2020.

The post Call: Doing Historical Research on Migration in the Digital Age first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Not a Given Object: What Historians Can Learn from the Reflexive Turn in Migration Studies

„Migration“ is not a stable, preexisting category but rather a product of societal processes that shape what the term comprises. We must take these entanglements with the past into account in our present-day research.

The post Not a Given Object: What Historians Can Learn from the Reflexive Turn in Migration Studies first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search