Kategorie: Migrationsgeschichte

Refuge and Refuse: Migrant Knowledge and Environmental Education in Germany

Joela Jacobs observes that “Migrant knowledge figures as a category of absence” in Europe. In Germany, one core issue is knowledge about recycling requirements and expectations. Efforts to teach it “betray an unreflective understanding of cultural identity”: knowing how to separate one’s trash serves as a marker of who belongs. (1,450 words)

Of Dodos, Cane, and Migrants: Networking Migrant Knowledge between Mauritius and Hawai’i in the 1860s


NICHOLAS B. MILLER: “Reconstituting the networks of the complex and mobile individuals through which indenture globally spread as a legal form of labor can sharpen our understanding of how migration practices and policies became universalized over the course of the nineteenth century, extending well beyond the framework of individual empires.” (1,745 words)

Following the Archives: Migrating Documents and their Changing Meanings

NICK UNDERWOOD reflects on how files he had expected to find in Paris for his study of Franco-Yiddishness during the interwar period had, in fact, migrated elsewhere. He uses his surprise to discuss the part played by rescued or stolen documents in “the migratory history of knowledge and knowledge-making.”

A Little Advice: Syrian American Advice Booklets as Knowledge Production


STACY D. FAHRENTHOLD discusses the significance of a 1909 Syrian American advice book for Ottoman subjects planning to emigrate to the United States. The Arabic-language text included knowledge about the would-be immigrants’ specific rights in America and the important self-fashioning necessary for dealing with U.S. authorities. (1,578 words)