Kategorie: Disziplinen und Ansätze

“The name of the game was globalization of goods, services and finance” and India was increasingly part of it – Interview with Michael Gadbaw

Stefan Tetzlaff, social and economic historian and former research fellow at the German Historical Institute Washington, had the chance to interview Michael Gadbaw, former vice-president and Senior Counsel of General Electric (1990-2008) about his involvement with India. The interview was conducted in Potomac, Maryland, in April 2019.

Migrant Knowledge Notes 6

Marginalized Migrant Knowledge: The Reception of German-Speaking Refugee Historians in West Germany after 1945

Today we offer two examples of academic knowledge on the move in tandem with the Migrant Knowledge blog. Anna Corsten looks at the reception of two German-speaking refugee historians in West Germany, and Razak Khan discusses the place of certain travel experiences in Magnus Hirschfeld’s thought. In Germany today, Hans Rosenberg (1904–1988) and Raul Hilberg … Continue reading Marginalized Migrant Knowledge: The Reception of German-Speaking Refugee Historians in West Germany after 1945

Knowledge in Transit: Global Encounters and Transformation in Magnus Hirschfeld’s Travelogue

In spite of all, in spite of all—the time will come when man will reach out his hand to his brother, all over the world. —Magnus Hirschfeld   Magnus Hirschfield (1868–1935) was a world-renowned pioneer in sexology.1 Years of his modern scientific knowledge production on sexology were monumentalized with the establishment of the Institute of … Continue reading Knowledge in Transit: Global Encounters and Transformation in Magnus Hirschfeld’s Travelogue

Marginalized Migrant Knowledge: The Reception of German-Speaking Refugee Historians in West Germany after 1945

Anna Corsten examines the reception of two German-speaking refugee historians in West Germany, Hans Rosenberg and Raul Hilberg. In both cases, their work was initially marginalized, but later it entered the mainstream of German historiography. Why? What role did migration play in their work and its reception? (1,922 words)

Knowledge in Transit: Global Encounters and Transformation in Magnus Hirschfeld’s Travelogue

Razak Khan looks at the role Islam and Muslims played for Hirschfeld in his 1933 travelogue, in which he described his encounters in Indonesia, India, and the Near East. According to Khan, “the tolerance and coexistence [Hirschfeld] encountered on his journey taught him how closely connected the issues of sexual and cultural diversity were. (2,400 words)

Background Knowledge: Interrogating Perceptions of Smugglers with Joseph Roth

Allison Schmidt makes a case for not prejudging people smugglers in history or the testimony they left behind in state police records. Drawing on the suggestive observations of Joseph Roth, her example centers on Eastern and Central Europe in the interwar period, after the breakup of empires had changed the legal status and economic situation of so many people. (1,547 words)

Knowledge and Young Migrants

Now available at the University of Chicago Press Journals: “Knowledge and Young Migrants,” special issue of KNOW: A Journal on the Formation of Knowledge 3, no. 2 (Fall 2019): 191–351. Edited by Simone Lässig and Swen Steinberg.

  • “Why Young Migrants Matter in the History of Knowledge” by Simone Lässig and Swen Steinberg
  • “Child-Rearing as a Form of American Knowledge” by Paula S. Fass
  • “What Debora’s Letters Do: Producing Knowledge for the Basel Mission Family” by Simone Laqua-O’Donnell
  • “Between Two Worlds: Chinese Immigrant Children and the Production of Knowledge in the Era of Chinese Exclusion” by Wendy L. Rouse
  • “African Youth on the Move in Postwar Greater France: Experiential Knowledge and Decolonial Politics at the End of the Empire” by Emily Marker
  • “The Way to School between Two Worlds”: Documenting the Knowledge of Second-Generation Immigrant Children in Switzerland, 1977–1983″ by Kijan Espahangizi
  • “Young People’s Agency and the Production of Knowledge in Migration Processes: The Federal Republic of Germany after 1945” by Stephanie Zloch

Rebels against the Homeland: Turkish Guest Workers in 1980s West German Anthropology

Michelle Lynn Kahn revisits Werner Schiffauer’s 1991 classic Die Migranten aus Subay (The Migrants from Subay) and reminds us of “a crucial reality: migrants have lives of their own before they arrive in host societies, and they never cease to maintain ties, whether physical or emotional, to the homelands they leave behind.” (2,337 words)

Women’s Citizenship Education and Voting as Knowledge Practices

What does citizenship entail? For many it is not just a passive right but rather comprises a more fragile set of practices, duties, and beliefs that need to be reworked and reaffirmed along the way. It might be useful to think of “citizenship” as a container for a wide variety of ascribed meanings in time. … Continue reading Women’s Citizenship Education and Voting as Knowledge Practices