Verschlagwortet: politics

History: An Important but Potentially Dangerous Part of the Humanities

By Antje Flüchter (History, University of Bielefeld, Germany). Before I start, I want to lay open the social and cultural position I am writing from: I write this piece as a historian, from a White female German perspective: History is a part of the humanities, but history is perhaps closer to politics and power than some of the other parts of the humanities.

The Urgency of Relocating Gender Studies Politically

By Shereen Abouelnaga (English and Comparative Literature, Cairo University, Egypt). To speak about the importance of gender studies is like reinventing the wheel, not to mention the attempt at discrediting all past scholarship. My concern, instead, is about how (the why is a corollary) to revive and relocate gender studies to restore the political core of the feminist project and thought, which would endow it with a more productive role in the humanities.

The National Frame: Art and State Violence in Turkey and Germany

By Banu Karaca. The National Frame emerged out of my long-term interest in art, aesthetics and politics. I have always been fascinated by the dominant notion that art is inherently good, by the many values that are accorded to art – be it that art furthers individual agency and critical faculties, the emancipatory potential of art, or its civilizing impact – and the realities that shape the daily workings of the art world.

Transatlantic Migrants and Knowledge in the U.S. Immigrant Press

The author discusses the source value of U.S. immigrant newspapers. If there are many reasons to approach them with caution, they can still help scholars learn “what migrants knew and wanted their fellow migrants to know…”

The post Transatlantic Migrants and Knowledge in the U.S. Immigrant Press first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Three Questions That Make One

By Bashir Bashir and Leila Farsakh. Over the past two decades, Middle Eastern and European politics have been impacted by three critical developments that call into question dominant understandings of nationalism, citizenship, and decolonization. The aggressive and ongoing colonization of Palestine created irreversible realities that cast serious doubts on the feasibility of partition and the “two-state solution.”

“The name of the game was globalization of goods, services and finance” and India was increasingly part of it – Interview with Michael Gadbaw

Stefan Tetzlaff, social and economic historian and former research fellow at the German Historical Institute Washington, had the chance to interview Michael Gadbaw, former vice-president and Senior Counsel of General Electric (1990-2008) about his involvement with India. The interview was conducted in Potomac, Maryland, in April 2019.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search