Verschlagwortet: historiography

Debating New Approaches to Histories of the Sciences

All are invited to attend the online symposium “Debating New Approaches to Histories of the Sciences,” organized as part of the History of Knowledge Seminar Series @ Utrecht University. Friday, May 21, 2021, 9:30–17:30 CET Online via Microsoft Teams (registration not required) Recent decades have seen the emergence of a number of promising new approaches … Continue reading Debating New Approaches to Histories of the Sciences

The post Debating New Approaches to Histories of the Sciences appeared first on History of Knowledge.

History: An Important but Potentially Dangerous Part of the Humanities

By Antje Flüchter (History, University of Bielefeld, Germany). Before I start, I want to lay open the social and cultural position I am writing from: I write this piece as a historian, from a White female German perspective: History is a part of the humanities, but history is perhaps closer to politics and power than some of the other parts of the humanities.

Knowledge as an Object of Historical Research

Nearly two years ago, Shadi Bartsch tweeted five tenets for understanding knowledge that now appear the on website of the center she directs at the University of Chicago, namely, The Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge. These tenets deserve further elucidation and discussion, a process I’d like to begin on this blog, starting at … Continue reading Knowledge as an Object of Historical Research

The post Knowledge as an Object of Historical Research appeared first on History of Knowledge.

L’historiographie africaine et les défis de la périodisation européenne : un commentaire historique

Un texte de Ihediwa Nkemjika Chimee. L’historiographie africaine suit des divisions, schémas et séquences imposés par les européens. Ceux-ci ont affirmé dans le passé que l’histoire africaine n’existait pas et que l’histoire de l’Afrique débute avec l’histoire des européens en Afrique.

Not a Given Object: What Historians Can Learn from the Reflexive Turn in Migration Studies

“Migration” is not a stable, preexisting category but rather a product of societal processes that shape what the term comprises. We must take these entanglements with the past into account in our present-day research.

The post Not a Given Object: What Historians Can Learn from the Reflexive Turn in Migration Studies first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Viral Hive Knowledge: Twitter, Historians, and Coronavirus/COVID-19

We are all historians of the present. At least we should be. Many fellow historians of knowledge are currently using a wide variety of media to share their experience and research in an effort to put the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic into context. Twitter is one medium where this conversation is especially lively, … Continue reading Viral Hive Knowledge: Twitter, Historians, and Coronavirus/COVID-19

Marginalized Migrant Knowledge: The Reception of German-Speaking Refugee Historians in West Germany after 1945

Today we offer two examples of academic knowledge on the move in tandem with the Migrant Knowledge blog. Anna Corsten looks at the reception of two German-speaking refugee historians in West Germany, and Razak Khan discusses the place of certain travel experiences in Magnus Hirschfeld’s thought. In Germany today, Hans Rosenberg (1904–1988) and Raul Hilberg … Continue reading Marginalized Migrant Knowledge: The Reception of German-Speaking Refugee Historians in West Germany after 1945

Marginalized Migrant Knowledge: The Reception of German-Speaking Refugee Historians in West Germany after 1945

Anna Corsten examines the reception of two German-speaking refugee historians in West Germany, Hans Rosenberg and Raul Hilberg. In both cases, their work was initially marginalized, but later it entered the mainstream of German historiography. Why? What role did migration play in their work and its reception? (1,922 words)

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search