Kategorie: Institute

Invective Loops: How Shaming Migrants Shapes Knowledge Orders

The authors discuss disparagement practices using the „invectivity“ approach developed at the TU Dresden. Shaming helps demarcate in-groups from out-groups, feeding communication loops and producing emotions beyond the immediate parties involved.

The post Invective Loops: How Shaming Migrants Shapes Knowledge Orders first appeared in Migrant Knowledge.

Louis Agassiz and the Classification of Brazil’s Fish

Louis Agassiz (1807–1873) was a young student at the University of Munich when Johann von Spix and Carl Friedrich von Martius returned from their expedition to Brazil. Among the many items and specimens the German naturalists brought back were fish. The methodology they had followed on their journey through what was then part of the … Continue reading Louis Agassiz and the Classification of Brazil’s Fish

The post Louis Agassiz and the Classification of Brazil’s Fish appeared first on History of Knowledge.

“Colonizing Men’s Bodies: Natureculture Metaphors Around Hair Transplantation” presented at the panel “Is There a Middle Eastern Body?”

Dr. Melike Şahinol and Burak Taşdizen have presented the selected findings of their ongoing research project “Hair:y_less Masculinities: A Cartography” at “I U A E S: The Re-invention of Traditions in the Middle East” conference at the panel “Is There …

readme.txt: „Tabu, Trauma und Identität: Subjektkonstruktionen von PalästinenserInnen in Deutschland und in der Schweiz, 1960-2015“

Lesen, Schreiben und Publizieren sind die Essenz von „Geisteswissenschaften als Beruf“. In der Rubrik readme.txt stellen wir die Publikationen der Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler der Max Weber Stiftung vor. Vier kurze Fragen und Antworten machen…

Blogging Histories of Knowledge in the Context of Digital History

A little article about this blog that I wrote with Kerstin von der Krone is now open access. See “Blogging Histories of Knowledge in Washington, D.C.,” in “Digital History,” ed. Simone Lässig, special issue, Geschichte und Gesellschaft 47, no. 1 (2021): 163–74. The abstract reads: The authors reflect on their experiences as the founding editors … Continue reading Blogging Histories of Knowledge in the Context of Digital History

The post Blogging Histories of Knowledge in the Context of Digital History appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Six Calls That Caught Our Attention

Conference: What Makes a Philosopher Good or Bad? Intellectual Virtues and Vices in the History of Philosophy. Utrecht University, November 25–26, 2021. Proposal deadline: August 21, 2021. Conference: Professorial Career Patterns Reloaded – Data, Methods and Analysis of Digital Humanities Research in the Field of Early Modern Academic History. Herzog August Library, Wolfenbüttel, and HTWK … Continue reading Six Calls That Caught Our Attention

The post Six Calls That Caught Our Attention appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Transatlantic Connections of the Women’s Movement in the Long 19th Century: Interview with Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson

Editorial Note: Professor Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson has been Chair of the Transatlantic History and Culture Department at the University of Augsburg since 2016. Previously, she served for five years as Deputy Director of the German Historical Institute in Washington, D.C. Her research focuses on Transatlantic relations, African American history, women’s history, and religious history. As part of her blog series on the history of the women’s movement in a transatlantic perspective, Marietheres Pirngruber spoke with Professor Waldschmidt-Nelson in April 2021. Interview: Marietheres PirngruberTranslation: Erik Brown … Continue reading Transatlantic Connections of the Women’s Movement in the Long 19th Century: Interview with Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson

Germans Go Subtropical: Migration and the Quest for Environmental-Climatic Knowledge in South America

German migration in subtropical South America began in the early nineteenth century. It lasted for almost 150 years and shaped one of the most extensive projects of transnational forest colonization and global agricultural exchange in history. This experience catalyzed the formation of different bodies of knowledge, many of them currently either lost or “fugitive,” as … Continue reading Germans Go Subtropical: Migration and the Quest for Environmental-Climatic Knowledge in South America

The post Germans Go Subtropical: Migration and the Quest for Environmental-Climatic Knowledge in South America appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Knowledge Notes

Occasional notes on calls, events, publications, and more that caught our attention. Please tweet or email us your own items. Calls Lake Constance-Retreat “History of Knowledge” 2021, University of Constance, September 29 – October 1, 2021, in person and online. Application Deadline: July 18, 2021. The aim of the retreat is to discuss current research … Continue reading Knowledge Notes

The post Knowledge Notes appeared first on History of Knowledge.

Episode 2: Fernsehen und Feminismus – Von Massenmedien und Emanzipationsbewegungen

Die zweite Episode unseres „Wissen entgrenzen“-Podcasts führt nicht nur nach Großbritannien an das Deutsche Historische Institut London, sondern auch zurück in das geteilte Deutschland. Christina von Hodenberg und Jane Freeland berichten über die Zusammenhänge zwischen Emanzipationsbewegungen und dem Aufstig der Massenmedien.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search